Low-skill employment and the changing economy in rural America
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Low-skill employment and the changing economy in rural America by Robert M. Gibbs

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Rural development -- United States.,
  • Semiskilled labor -- United States.,
  • Wages -- Skilled labor -- United States.,
  • Wages -- Service industries -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementRobert GIbbs, Lorin Kusmin, and John Cromartie.
SeriesEconomic research report -- no. 10., Economic research report (United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service) -- no. 10.
ContributionsKusmin, Lorin D., Cromartie, John., United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 32 p. :
Number of Pages32
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18244215M

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Low-skill employment and the changing economy in rural America (OCoLC) Online version: Gibbs, Robert M. (Robert Martin), Low-skill employment and the changing economy in rural America. [Washington, D.C.?]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, [] (OCoLC) Material Type. Introduction --Data and methods --Rural America and the prevalence of low-skill employment --Rural low-skill employment declines outpace the nation's --Structural factors driving rural low-skill employment trends in the s --How rural low-skill change in the s compares with the s --Implications of low skill employment trends for. Request PDF | Low Skill Employment and the Changing Economy of Rural America | This study reports trends in rural low-skill employment in the s and their impact on the rural .   Abstract. This study reports trends in rural low-skill employment in the s and their impact on the rural workforce. The share of rural jobs classified as low-skill fell by percentage points between and , twice the decline of the urban low-skill employment share, but much less than the decline of the s.

Low-Skill Workers in Rural America Face Permanent Job Loss AMY GLASMEIER AND PRISCILLA SALANT I ncreases in productivity and international competition are changing the na-ture of work in rural America. Job losses are mounting in communities where low-skill employment has dominated the economy. From through   Global economic competition and other factors have cost rural America million jobs in the past six years. This brief analyzes job displacement figures from around the country between and The loss of rural jobs was particularly large in the manufacturing sector, and the rate of loss was higher in the rural Northeast than in the rest of rural America. it generates 90 per cent of employment opportunities in some countries, and contributes up to 38 per cent of g DP in others. In rural areas, the informal economy sustains livelihoods of impoverished populations through natural resource and land based economic .   It’s high time we cease to see software jobs as the sole horizon for unemployed and underemployed workers. Instead, we should promote new jobs in proximity services and make them more attractive.

  Nor is it likely that the slight increase in rural jobs since brings much comfort. As the resource extraction economy continues to shrink, most of the new jobs in rural areas are being.   ERS research in this area focuses on labor market conditions and educational attainment in rural (nonmetropolitan) America. The labor market measures discussed here include the level of employment, the employment/population ratio, the unemployment rate, and the labor force participation rate. Educational attainment is closely linked to labor market outcomes. From a demographic standpoint, “rural” refers to very small populations and population densities. Although many of those at the workshop are from Iowa or elsewhere in the Midwest, the United States has many types of rural settings different from those in the Midwest. The almost infinite variety of rural areas means that in terms of health issues, policies, and programs, what might work for.   "In a new book, The New Geography of Jobs, University of California at Berkeley economics professor Enrico Moretti argues that for each job in the software, technology and life-sciences industries, five new jobs are indirectly created in the local economy. The jobs range from yoga instructors to restaurant owners. Mr.