Collegiality and bureaucracy in the modern university
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Collegiality and bureaucracy in the modern university the influence of information and power on decision-making structures by James L. Bess

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Published by Teachers College Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Universities and colleges -- United States -- Administration.,
  • Organization.,
  • Decision making.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJames L. Bess.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsLB2328.2 .B47 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 197 p. :
Number of Pages197
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2388830M
ISBN 100807728683
LC Control Number87018004

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(). Collegiality and Bureaucracy in the Modern University: The Influence of Information and Power on Decision-Making Structures. The Journal of Higher Education: Vol. 61, No. 1, pp. Cited by:   In , James Bess of New York University identified three distinct kinds of collegiality in his book Collegiality and Bureaucracy in the Modern University: The Influence of Information and Power on Decision-Making Structures. The first is what he called “structural collegiality”: the academic self-governance that has its historical roots. Using Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) as a case study, the paper examines how the governance and management of USM has changed when it became corporatized in It will be argued that corporatization has changed the academic culture from collegial . The paper assumes that both academic demos andintellectual collegiality should be centralcharacteristics of any institution that intendsto call itself a university. Collegiality and Bureaucracy in the Modern University. New York, Teachers College Press. Google Scholar. Brock, M.G. & Curthoys, M.C. (eds.) (). Garden City, New York.

  My notes on Nash, K. (). Neo-liberalisation, universities and the values of bureaucracy. The Sociological Review, It is too easy to frame neoliberalism in institutions as an outcome rather than a project. In this thoughtful paper, Kate Nash explores the space which this recognition opens up, the "competing and contradictory values in the everyday life of public . Bureaucracy and Democracy B. Guy Peters University of Pittsburgh The terms bureaucracy and democracy are usually thought of, both in the academic and the popular literature, as antithetical approaches to providing governance for a society (see Etzioni-Halevey, ). On the one hand public bureaucracies are typically conceptualized as necessary. This insightful book theorizes the contrast between two logics of organization: bureaucracy and collegiality. Based on this theory and employing a new methodology to transform our sociological understanding, Emmanuel Lazega sheds light on complex organizational phenomena that impact markets, political economy, and social stratification. James Bess () in his ―Collegiality and Bureaucracy in the Modern University‖ articulates that collegiality consists of three components: culture, decision-making structure, and the process of 3 Collegiality and Judicial decision making, p.

  The rise in college bureaucracy is nothing new, and has been noted for quite some time. Ralph Reiland wrote in in the National Review that “over the past two decades, the number of college and university faculty has increased by 30 per cent and the number of non-faculty jobs on campus has more than doubled.”. Abstract This article analyzes Weber's writing on the topic of collegiality in Economy and Society in order to reintegrate the concept of collegiality with his other concepts of legitimate domination, status group closure, bureaucracy, and legal formalism. Collegiality and Bureaucracy in the Modern University: The Influence of Information and Power on Decision-Making Structures by James L. Bess avg rating — 0 ratings — published Books devoted to the subject of politics and conflict in the academic setting typically contain a chapter or two devoted to conflict among peers. See, e.g.,James L. Bess, Collegiality and Bureaucracy in the Modern University (New York, ); Cynthia Berryman-Fink, Can We Agree to Disagree?